Talk:Logic board

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Previous discussion without headers[edit]

Oh good... back on its own page.

Logic board different from motherboard[edit]

Could someone expand on this topic? Apple seems inconsistent.

In addition, Xserve G5 features dual Gigabit Ethernet on the motherboard, which, combined with the high bandwidth system controller, means you won’t get contention between your network traffic and other I/O.
Gigabit for two: Xserve comes with dual Gigabit Ethernet on the main logic board so you can serve more clients without contention.

Emphasis mine. AlistairMcMillan 22:52, 22 April 2006 (UTC)

Xserve isn't a full-fledged computer. SushiGeek 18:40, 23 April 2006 (UTC)

Seems wrong to me...[edit]

..I can't see that a Motherboard necessarily needs a BIOS. The definition seems quite wrong to me. DavidFarmbrough 07:47, 26 April 2006 (UTC)

Good Grief...[edit]

Liquidmark 04:01, 12 May 2006 (UTC)

The term "logicboard" hails back to the early Apple computers. Back then, everything was soldered onto one board. Even some of the early Mac's followed that philosophy. A logicboard IS different from a motherboard. That's why they have different names. Let's take a look at the definition of Motherboard, shall we:

motherboard |ˈməðərˌbôrd| noun Computing a printed circuit board containing the principal components of a microcomputer or other device, with connectors into which other circuit boards can be slotted.

See?

A Logicboard is a printed circuit board that is complete with no slots for adding more circuit boards. You can't call it a "motherboard" because it does not fit the definition.

There are also definitions of a Logic Board having Logic Circuits. Probably another reason it is called a Logic Board.

Just because two things have something in common, doesn't mean that they are the same.

I mean, how often is a Hummer called an SUV? How often is an A-10 called a fighter? Wanna call an iPod video a MP3 player? Different words exist for a reason. >:O


I agree with these points and will edit the article to reflect the differences. Cliph 23:04, 25 July 2006 (UTC)
all fine, except Apple also called the Apple II boards logic boards, even though they do fit the defintion of motherboard. Logic board is just an Apple-ism —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.125.110.223 (talk) 19:00, 17 December 2007 (UTC)